Psycholinguistics of Language Production (PSYL10027)

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Psycholinguistics of Language Production (PSYL10027)

Language production is a deceptively complex task. In this option, we will consider how people are able to rapidly retrieve and combine words to form grammatical utterances, both with and without the presence of a listener. We will begin by considering the fundamental processes that are involved in producing utterances. We then focus on how these processes might be affected by the presence of a listener, by examining current research on language production in dialogue and considering how children might learn to communicate effectively.

Aims

• To introduce and guide independent study of current research literature in the psychology of language production, with reference to monologue and dialogue contexts.

• To examine a variety of methods of investigating language production.

• To explore and contrast different theoretical approaches to language production.

• To encourage the making of connections between language production and other aspects of human cognition and behaviour.

• To encourage critical and analytic thinking.

Mondays 14:10 - 16:00
Semester 1, Block 2
7 George Square, Room S.1
1
Methodological issues and overview
We will start off by considering why language production is difficult. We then consider some of the methodologies that have been developed to study language production, before discussing the various stages of processing that have been identified, and how they might fit into a model of language production.
7 George Square, Room S.1
29/10/2018 - 2:10pm to 4:00pm
2
Lexical processing
We discuss how speakers choose and retrieve the right words, and how this process may sometimes go wrong.
7 George Square, Room S.1
05/11/2018 - 2:10pm to 4:00pm
3
Syntactic processing
We consider how speakers put together individual words to make complex sentences, and the factors that may affect this process.
7 George Square, Room S.1
12/11/2018 - 2:10pm to 4:00pm
4
Language production in children’s and adults’ dialogues
We explore how language production occurs in dialogue, and the extent to which speakers may be cooperative, adapting their utterances to fit their audience, or selfish, focusing primarily on their own needs. We discuss how children develop the skills needed to communicate effectively.
7 George Square, Room S.1
19/11/2018 - 2:10pm to 4:00pm
5
Language production in children’s and adults’ dialogues
We explore how language production occurs in dialogue, and the extent to which speakers may be cooperative, adapting their utterances to fit their audience, or selfish, focusing primarily on their own needs. We discuss how children develop the skills needed to communicate effectively.
7 George Square, Room S.1
26/11/2018 - 2:10pm to 4:00pm
Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of the course you should:

• be familiar with models of language production;

• understand the experimental and other evidence that supports the various models;

• be familiar with major experimental techniques for investigating language production;

• be able to apply your knowledge to wider discussion of how children and adults use language.

References: 

Lecture 1 - Bock, K., & Huitema, J. (1999). Language production. In S. Garrod & M. Pickering (Eds.), Language Processing (pp. 365-388). Hove: Psychology Press.

Lecture 2 - Levelt, W.J.M., Roelofs, A., & Meyer, A.S. (1999). A theory of lexical access in speech production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 22, 1-75.

Lecture 3 - Bock, K. & Levelt, W.J.M. (1994). Language production: grammatical encoding. In M.Gernsbacher (Ed). Handbook of Psycholinguistics, Academic Press, New York.

Lecture 4 and 5 - Garrod, S. (1999). The challenge of dialogue for theories of language processing. In S. Garrod & M. Pickering (Eds.), Language Processing (pp. 389-415). Hove: Psychology Press.

Further detailed references will be provided during the course.

Additional Information: 

Assessment

Essay, worth 100% of final mark (maximum length 3000 words). A choice of essay topics will be provided.

An electronic copy must be submitted through an own work declaration confirmation form and Turnitin link in Learn by the deadline. The electronic submission allows us to check for plagiarism and word count.

The submission deadline must be observed. Failure to comply with the deadline without good reason will incur mark penalties as follows:

  • Up to 7 calender days, 5 marks per calender day will be deducted
  • More than 7 calender days late a mark of zero will be given