Psychological Therapies (PSYL10145)

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Psychological Therapies (PSYL10145)

 

Semester 1, Tuesday 2.10pm - 4pm

BPS core area – Individual Differences, Social

Clinical Psychologists adhere to a Scientist-Practitioner model, using the empirical evidence base of outcome research in the application of treatments for people  in distress. Clinical Psychologists adhere to a Scientist-Practitioner model, using the empirical evidence base of outcome research in the application of treatments for people in distress. This course examines current practice in psychological therapies, and the psychological research which informs this. Attention will be paid to claims about evidence and its application in diverse clinical settings and across specific populations. This will include: an examination of a competency and evidence-based approach to psychological therapies and a discussion of the research designs which underpin this; assessment, case-formulation and the decisional framework for intervention; the development of psychoanalytic approaches and their current application; interpersonal models of therapy and the therapeutic alliance; the influence, legacy and application of behaviourism; the cognitive turn in therapy and its application across diverse clinical presentations; the third wave of psychological therapies and the move to acceptance-based models; technology-mediated delivery and the use of mobile devices; systemic approaches with carers and family members; psychological therapies with specific populations.

Skills developed within this course include critical analysis of what constitutes evidence; an ability to understand how clinical judgements are formed; the ability to differentiate between different theoretical psychological models and why they have influenced service delivery; a understanding of clinical psychology as a discipline. 

 

Assessment 

Mid-course MCQ test 30%; end of course essay 70%. 

Aim

To provide an overview of models of psychological therapies, and current methods of delivery.

Objectives

To examine models of psychological therapy and their historical development, alongside their current delivery within a UK context. Models of psychological difficulties, and the manner in which they underpin these therapies, will be emphasised. Consideration of the methodological difficulties in gathering evidence for psychological therapies will also be made.

 

Tuesdays 2:10 - 4:00pm

Semester 1, Block 3

 Lecture #   Topic  Date Location 
 1   Competency and evidence-based approach to   psychological therapies and a discussion of the   research designs which underpin this  18/09/2018
 2   Assessment, case-formulation and the decisional   framework for intervention  25/09/2018
 3  Development of psychoanalytic approaches and their   current application  02/10/2018
 4  Interpersonal models of therapy and the therapeutic   alliance  09/10/2018
 5  Influence, legacy and application of behaviourism  16/10/2018
 No lecture  23/10/2018
 6  The cognitive turn in therapy and its application   across diverse clinical presentations  30/10/2018
 7  The third wave of psychological therapies and the   move to acceptance-based models  06/11/2018
 8  Systemic approaches with carers and family members  13/11/2018
 9  Technology-mediated delivery and the use of mobile   devices  20/11/2018
 10  Psychological therapies with specific populations  27/11/2018
Learning Outcomes: 

 

By the end of the Module, students should have an understanding of:

 An understanding of the scientist-practitioner model and its relevance to psychological therapies.
 Knowledge of what constitutes scientific evidence and its application.
 How intervention is informed by assessment and problem formulation.
 An understanding of the historical development and legacies of psychotherapies and their current applications.
 How therapies have relevance across different clinical populations and presentations.

 

 

References: 

 

Learning Methods and Resources

The course will be taught in lecture format, with slides, reading lists and learning outcomes for each lecture available at least seven days in advance.  There is no specific requirement for students to read each week’s key references beforehand, although students may wish to do so in order to support their learning. Some representative references are given below, but there will be specific reading lists for each lecture.

Main textbook

Barlow, David H. (Editor). (2014). The Oxford Handbook of Clinical Psychology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Additional/ Background Reading

A-Tjak, J. G. L., Davis, M. L., Morina, N., Powers, M. B., Smits, J. a J., & Emmelkamp, P. M. G. (2014). A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Clinically Relevant Mental and Physical Health Problems. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 84, 30–36.

Allen, D. (2009). Positive behavioural support as a service system for people with challenging behaviour.  Psychiatry, 8, 408 – 412.

Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Wilson, K. G. (2012). Contextual Behavioral Science: Creating a science more adequate to the challenge of the human condition. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 1, 1–16.

Kahl, K.G., Winter, L. & Schweiger, U. (2012). The third wave of cognitive behavioural therapies: what is new and what is effective? Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 25, 522 – 528.

Khatri, N., Marziali, E., Tchernikov, I. & Shepherd, N. (2014). Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 9, 765 – 770.

NHS Education Scotland. (2011). The Matrix: A guide to delivering evidence-based psychological therapies in Scotland. Edinburgh: NES. Retrieved from: http://www.nes.scot.nhs.uk/media/425354/psychology_matrix_2011s.pdf

Shedler, J. (2010). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65, 98 – 109.

Twohig, M. P. (2012). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19(4), 499–507.

Vereenooghe, L. & Langdon, P.E.  (2013). Psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities: A systematic review and meta-analysis.  Research in Developmental Disabilities, 34, 4085 – 4102.

Wuthrich, V.M., Frei, J., Pachana, N.A. & Oude-Voshaar, R.C.  (2015)

Barriers to treatment for older adults seeking psychological therapy. International Psychogeriatrics, 2015, 27, 1227-1236. 

 

Additional Information: 

 

Assessment

30% Mid-course MCQ test (40, 5 answer option)

70% Essay (3000 word). One answer from a choice of three topics.

Detailed Assessment Information - 

Essay: draft submitted week , feedback week

The mid-term MCQ test is a summative assessment (so the mark will provide numerical feedback as to grade). Also, as the MCQ test is designed to assess foundational knowledge about the course topic, performance on the MCQ test will provide formative feedback as to whether students have a good grasp of the foundations or need to do some more study to consolidate knowledge and provide the necessary basis for more advanced parts of the course to follow.

 

Relationship Between Assessment and Learning Outcomes - 

LO1: MCQs will assess knowledge of the scientist-practitioner model and its relevance to psychological therapies.

LO2: MCQs will assess a critical understanding of what constitutes scientific evidence and its application.

LO3: MCQs will assess knowledge of  how intervention is informed by assessment and problem formulation.

LO4: Essay will assess the understanding of the historical development and legacies of psychotherapies and their current applications.

LO5: Essay will assess the understanding of how therapies have relevance across different clinical populations and presentations.

 

Main Graduate Attributes - 

 

Research & Enquiry:

Provide clear, well-organised arguments concerning the development of psychological therapies and the research evidence which underpins them, how they are applied and the challenges of specific problem presentations, clinical populations and therapeutic contexts.

Personal & Intellectual Autonomy:

Ability to read texts critically, with an awareness of the assumptions and attitudes that underlie them and underpin interpretation.

The ability to work independently.

Communication skills

Communicate effectively with other people, using verbal and written means.