Memory and Amnesia

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Memory and Amnesia

These lectures are about why and how we learn, what happens in our brain when we learn and how understanding the basic principles of learning can shape our behaviour. The lectures will illustrate also how and why we forget, and what happens when we forget too much. Finally, the lectures will touch upon the issue of how imperfect our memories are and what we could do to improve our retention.

Please note that these lectures are not recorded. 
 

Lecture 40:
How we learn
We are almost constantly learning. How does this happen? Can we learn without noticing? Which bits and bolts of the brain allow us to learn?
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Monday, 21 January, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 41:
How and why we forget
Forgetting has a bad publicity, yet we need to forget in order to learn new stuff. Can we forget on purpose?
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre B
Tuesday, 22 January, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 42:
Pathological forgetting
When we forget too much we become amnesic, understanding the different kinds of amnesia helps us understanding the cognitive architecture of memory.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Thursday, 24 January, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 43:
The different types of memory
Memory is an umbrella term which encompasses several different cognitive processes.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Monday, 28 January, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 44:
The pitfalls of recollection
We learn and we forget, but often we remember wrongly. Learning is a highly flawed system.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre B
Tuesday, 29 January, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 45:
Learning and retaining
Some techniques may help us learning and retaining what we have learned better.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Monday, 4 February, 2019 - 11:10 to 12:00
References: 

Essential readings:

Baddeley, A.D, Eysenck, M.W. & Anderson, M.C. (2015). Memory (2nd edition). Psychology Press
Please read chapter 5 - Learning. Pages 107-136.

Roediger, H.L., Weinstein, Y., and Agarwal, P. K. (2010) Forgetting : preliminary consideration. In Della Sala, S. (Ed.), Forgetting. (pp. 1-22). New York, NY, US: Psychology Press

Ward, J. (2015). The student's guide to cognitive neuroscience. Psychology Press.
Please read chapter 9 - The remembering brain. Pages 195-230