Doing Psychology

Home / Doing Psychology

Doing Psychology

Psychology is the study of people by people. These lectures will introduce you to some of the key issues that follow from this, and how they relate to what we study, how we study them, and why we do.

Lecture 1
Introduction to Qualitative Methods
General overview of qualitative research methods and introduction to Thematic Analysis. Cristina Marinho
50 George Sq, Lecture Theatre G.03
Monday, 13 January, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 2
Coding and analysis
How to code and analyse qualitative data using Thematic Analysis. Cristina Marinho
50 George Sq, Lecture Theatre G.03
Tuesday, 14 January, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 3
The Problem of Objectivity
How Psychologists have managed the problem of objectivity. Pete Lamont.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Thursday, 16 January, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 16
Observational methods
50 George Sq, Lecture Theatre G.03
Monday, 24 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 17
Research Synthesis
In this lecture we will talk about the various ways of approaching syntesizing research and research findings. In particular, we will discuss meta-analyses and coordinated analyses, with brief discussion of the growing field of meta-science.
50 George Sq, Lecture Theatre G.03
Tuesday, 25 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 18
Psychological objects
What we study, and their relationship to why and how we study them. Pete Lamont
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Thursday, 27 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of Psychology 2B, students know about some of the most popular general approaches to carrying out psychological research along with their rationales, strengths and pitfalls, main ethical issues in research and publishing, and some possible ways how the findings of psychological research can be usefully communicated outside academia. Also, students can efficiently identify most relevant literature on particular research topics and summarize the findings, know the basic principles of designing experiments, and they can prepare short presentations for lay audiences. Students will benefit the most if they have taken both Psychology 2A and Psychology 2B, but the content of this section of Psychology 2B does not necessarily depend on that of Psychology 2A.

References: 

There is no specific reading to go with these lectures.