Cognitive Neuroscience

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Cognitive Neuroscience

Cognitive Neuroscience is not only one of the most dynamic disciplines of modern science, it has also a considerable media presence and plays an increasing role in current debates about topics as diverse as society, education, politics, law and economics. In this lecture series, we will learn about the history, development and methodology of cognitive neuroscience. We will discuss the main structures of the brain, experience how brain lesions can influence the way people think, speak and behave and examine the opportunities and limits of neuroimaging and other modern research methods.

Lecture 34:
How do we learn about the brain?
This lecture will review some of the basic principles of brain function and how they are relevant to us as psychologists. We will begin to consider what tools are available to study brain function and what types of information they provide.
50 George Square, Lecture Theatre G.03
Monday, 3 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 35:
Learning from lesions: Part 1
The study of individuals with brain lesions has long been an essential source of information about neural processes. This lecture will discuss how these insights are generated, considering the logic of dissociations and the strengths and limitations of single-case studies.
50 George Square, Lecture Theatre G.03
Tuesday, 4 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 36:
Learning from lesions: Part 2
Here, we will consider how information about lesion location can bring an anatomical dimension to studies of patient groups. We will also look at how transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used to create temporary “virtual lesions” in healthy individuals.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Thursday, 6 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 37:
Electrophysiology
This lecture will discuss techniques that record the brain’s electrical activity. We will consider what information is provided by single-cell recordings in animals and by scalp-based EEG in humans.
50 George Square, Lecture Theatre G.03
Monday, 10 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 38:
Functional neuroimaging: Part 1
In this lecture, we will begin to look at one of the most ubiquitous techniques in modern cognitive neuroscience: fMRI. The lecture will cover the basic principles of MRI, what the BOLD signal is and what it means for a brain region to be “activated”.
50 George Square, Lecture Theatre G.03
Tuesday, 11 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 39
Functional neuroimaging: Part 2
This lecture will continue our exploration of fMRI and what it can tell us about the brain. We will look at some different designs for fMRI studies and how they provide different information about the functions of brain regions.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Thursday, 13 February, 2020 - 11:10 to 12:00
References: 

Essential Reading: Ward, J. (2015). The Student’s Guide to Cognitive Neuroscience (3rd Edition). Psychology Press (Lecture 1: Chapter 1; Lectures 2 and 3: Chapter 5; Lecture 4: Chapter 3; Lectures 5 and 6: Chapter 4)

Further information on the methods of cognitive neuroscience can be found in: Gazzaniga, M., Ivry, R. B., and Mangun, G. R. (2019). Cognitive Neuroscience: The Biology of the Mind. (4th or 5th Edition). New York: Norton and Co.

Newman, A. (2019). Research Methods for Cognitive Neuroscience. Los Angeles: Sage.