Abnormal Psychology

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Abnormal Psychology

Abnormal psychology is the branch of psychology concerned with the description, prediction, explanation, and, eventually, treatment of variations in human behaviour that are pathological. These lectures will cover some of the major disorders, focusing primarily on what research has to say about their biological bases and the implications they have for treatment. In addition, the lectures will describe several methodological approaches, ask fundamental questions about the meaning of normality, and, finally, examine how these issues have been addressed by the laws and courts.

The lectures are accompanied by a 2-hour lab and a 1-hour tutorial.

Lecture 10:
Categorical, symptom and functional models
Classification systems have dominated how we think about abnormality. We will compare and contrast different models.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Monday, 8 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 11:
The role of assessment and formulation
While psychology has ‘borrowed’ from diagnostic models, it has also promoted individual assessment and formulation of variations in experiences. We will examine why this is important.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre B
Tuesday, 9 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 12:
Stress and distress
We often use ‘stress’ and ‘distress’ interchangeably, but there is good evidence for both an adaptive stress response and a state of distress. We will examine these differences.
Room G.03 at 50 George Square
Thursday, 11 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 13:
Disorders of mood
Mood disorders refer pathological experiences such as depression and bipolar disorder. Mood disorders are sometimes called affective disorders. We will examine both presentation and psychological models.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre C
Monday, 15 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 14:
Disorders of behaviour
These are probably the most challenging for us to understand as they have an impact on the individual but also on those around them. We will look at the variety of ways that these problems are evidenced.
David Hume Tower Lecture Theatre B
Tuesday, 16 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Lecture 15:
Disorders of cognition
Cognitive complaints are and may present in a variety of ways other than classic "memory loss." We will look at recognition of impairment in several key cognitive domains as well as associated symptoms such as motor disorders, psychosis, and sleep disturbance.
Room G.03 at 50 George Square
Thursday, 18 October, 2018 - 11:10 to 12:00
Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of the course, students should:

  • Understand how several psychiatric disorders are classified and categorised.
  • Know the symptoms of these same psychiatric disorders, and, where applicable, how they are categorised.
  • Understand how common various disorders are.
  • Be familiar with research findings related to causal factors and outcomes of these disorders.
  • Know how disorders are treated via behavioural and pharmacological therapies.
  • Understand how the law deals with people who have disorders.
References: 

Butcher,  J.N.,  Hooley,  J.M.,  &  Mineka,  S.  (2013).  Abnormal  Psychology  (16th  edition).  Pearson International Edition. Allyn and Bacon.