Introduction to Research Methods & Statistics

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Introduction to Research Methods & Statistics

The Research Methods and Statistics lectures are designed to provide a background to the philosophy of scientific research and experimental design. The lectures will deal with broader conceptual issues around the analysis of psychological data and a brief introduction to statistical procedures. The lectures will complement the practical experience gained in the labs across the year, and provide a basis for more in depth treatment of statistical analysis in years 2 and 3.

 

Lecture No 1
Orientation
Orientation lecture that provides basic course information for all students. We will cover assessment structure, labs, tutorials, and lecture block organization.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
14/01/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 2
Looking at data; correlations.
Introduction to basic methodological material building on Y1A coverage. Students who have not taken Y1A should read textbook chapters 1 & 2. Here we'll cover basic linear correlation - how one variable changing can give us information about another variable changing.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
16/01/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 3
Narrative - bootstrapping/reciprocal causality of cognition
Bootstrapped cognitive system; limits of reductionism, non-linear feedback loops creating structure on multiple scales. Need for explicit model of 'emergence'.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
18/01/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 16
Looking at data; distributions
Basics of what a distribution is. Variability and central tendency.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
25/02/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 17
Looking at data; the Normal distribution
Focusing on the properties of the normal (Gaussian) distribution and its relationship with common statistics used in scientific psychology.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
27/02/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 18
Narrative
Complexity of systems; scaffolding of language and cog - link between developmental and language. Challenges of memory systems and intelligent behaviour.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
01/03/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 34
Introduction to R
By popular student demand, these lectures are for Psychology Majors. We will cover the basic introduction to the program R, which you will use in your statistics courses throughout the remainder of your degree (and for your dissertation). This is a gentle introduction to make your lives (much) easier when Y2 starts.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
01/04/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 35
Introduction to R
Concepts for R; basics of using & googling commands; Example of descriptives and plots
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
03/04/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 36
Introduction to R
Elementary plots; how to write & save commands; the need to be clear in comments for code.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
05/04/2019 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
References: 

At the end of these lectures, students should understand the basic concepts of a probability distribution, the normal (Gaussian) distribution in particular, and the concepts of linear relationship and correlation.

Psychology majors should also have a basic introduction to the existence of the program R.

Additional Information: 

References:

Schacter et al., Psychology (Second European edition, 2016), Chapters 1 & 2.

https://www.r-project.org/

https://www.rstudio.com/