Human Memory

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Human Memory

Human memory is a complex set of inter-related and interacting phenomena. These lectures introduce the different types of memory humans make use of, the properties and boundaries of these systems, and the methods for studying (and possibly training) them.

Lecture No 10
What is memory, and how is it studied by cognitive psychologists?
Memories and memory systems, selective memory deficits following brain damage.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
03/02/2020 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 11
Working memory
Keeping track moment to moment, working memory as a mental workspace, working memory components, evidence from neuropsychology and neuroimaging.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
05/02/2020 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 12
Organising and Remembering
Memory for events and memory for knowledge, impact of expertise and memory strategies on recall. Improving memory and memory training.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
07/02/2020 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 13
Forgetting
Patterns and causes of forgetting. Remembering and forgetting intentions - prospective memory and absent-mindedness.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
10/02/2020 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 14
Memory for Important Events & Absentmindedness
Flashbulb memories. Prospective memory. Remembering intentions. Amnesia following brain damage.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
12/02/2020 - 11:10am to 12:00pm
Lecture No 154
The Malleability of Memory
Changing and implanting memories, memory as reconstructions and false memories. Eye-witness memory.
David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre A
14/02/2020 - 11:10am to 14/03/2020 - 12:00pm
Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of this section, students should be able to:
- define key psychological concepts about human memory and illustrate them with relevant examples
- understand basic theoretical questions and arguments about the cognitive psychology of human memory.
- outline the types of research methods that cognitive psychologists have used to address questions about human memory.
- summarise some classic and some recent findings about human memory, along with examples of how those findings have implications for learning and memory in different aspects of everyday life.
- discuss how these findings relate to theoretical questions and arguments, as well as to the application of those findings to the use of memory in everyday life

 

References: 

 

Schacter et al. (2012); Chapter 5.

Suggested also:

Passer et al, Psychology: the science of mind and behaviour (2009), chapter 8.

 

For those interested in more detail about human memory, you could look at:

Baddeley, A.D., Eysenck, M.W., & Anderson, M.C. (2015). Memory.

Psychology Press.